THE TEAM

I. SOCHUM’s CHAIRS – BOGDAN & TEODORA

BOGDAN

Have you ever met someone whom you can define by being the much needed sunshine in a pouring rain? Well, that’s Bogdan Burghelea. A charismatic 18-year-old who loves to jam out to Spice Girls’ and Beyonce and whose persona can fill a room with laughter, just by being unapologetically himself. He has a strong, bold personality, as he enjoys to feel empowered when listening to music.

What makes Bogdan stand out from the other Chairs? Well, the answer to that is simple: his goal in life is to inspire people and be a role model. (By the way, if you’re ever in trouble, just call him profu’. Now shush! You didn’t hear that from us!) There are, of course, ways in which you can inspire him; even if your goal isn’t exactly that, but rather earning the Best Delegate Award. Care to know how?

“Just do your job, your research and be professional. I absolutely admire people who are professional, I love working with them. And also, be on time!”

Great, now you’re in the clear! Or… not? There might be something else that you need to do in order to gain this Chairperson’s heart: be a fashion icon! Surprised, right? Hey, let us just tell you that this is just one of the many surprises that await you at this year’s GalMUN!

 

Journalist: Tell us a little about your previous MUN experience.

Bogdan: I’ve started in 9th grade when I represented Canada in the Environment Committee where I got the Honorable Mention and that was a pretty big deal for me. Not only did it make me realise that I can express my opinions and can collaborate with other people in order to find solutions to problems, but it also made me hungry for more MUN. As a result, I was a delegate at IasiMUN and I received the Best Delegate Award.

As you may have already noticed, Bogdan is pretty much the best delegate since he also received this award at GalMUN 2016. He quickly understood that he really does have the necessary skills to work in the social field and interact with others. Also, he knew how to slay everyone withouth even blinking. Even though he took a hiatus from MUNs during 11th grade, to concentrate on German, he still remains the best delegate for us.

Journalist: When you were a delegate, which qualities did you wish your chair had and how do you plan to implement them as a chair yourself?

Bogdan:  I was really inspired by how Andra chaired our committee, she had all the qualities. However, later on I had a chairperson who was way too softspoken, it didn’t feel as if she were present. I want to be present, to be there for my delegates. I’d find an equilibrium between being loveable, kind and a person to rely on.

Journalist: Is there something you did as a delegate that you absolutely hate to see your delegates do now?

Bogdan: I used to talk bullsh*t, nonsense sometimes. I’m looking forward to seeing a person in the know that speaks whenever they need to speak and slays everyone.

Bogdan told us that at the beginning of his MUN experience, he wasn’t the most fashionable delegate. In fact, he used to dress awfully. He recalls that he wore a red shirt with an orange jacket on top. As a matter of fact, he wants his delegates to be “fashion icons”.

Journalist: What would be your advice to a first time delegate?

Bogdan: Definitely trust your intuition and gut because most of the times, if your first instinct says “do it” , then that means it’s the right decision. Moreover, as a newbie, your first idea is going to be the best. Have fun and enjoy it!

Journalist: Any pet-peeves we should know about?

Bogdan: First of all, don’t laugh if someone makes a grammar mistake because it’s just disrespectful. Second of all, not doing your research and then acting on what you’ve heard or think is just a “no” from me.

Seeing how he answered most of the previous questions, we strongly believe that, between him and Teo, Bogdan is for sure the “strict chair” or the bad cop who only wants the best for his delegates. Following this topic, here are some tips and tricks on how to get on his good side…

Bogdan(smiling): Just do your job, your research and be professional. I absolutely admire people who are professional, I love working with them. And also, be on time.

Journalist: Now that the serious questions are over, we’re ready to move onto some creative ones. I hope you’re up for this challenge. Why do we wear shoes?

Bogdan(laughing and moving his hands like crazy): Since we’re going through some sh*t in this country, at least you’ve got to look cute while going through it.

Journalist: How many square metres of pizza are consumed in Europe every year?

Bogdan: Hmm…I’ll come back with an answer, I have to do my research.

Journalist: Here we go, last question. If we were walking on our hands and everything else in the world remained the same, the sun would set in the East. Or would it not?

Bogdan: Yes, sometimes.

Notice that his last answer was an inside joke between him and his friends, but he kindly shared the joke with me. Now, if we’ve caught your attention and you want to find out the secret behind this inside joke, then write your application now. Join the SOCHUM committee!

motto: be the best you can be.

 

 

TEODORA

Meet Teodora Vlad, a 17-year-old whose presence and personality will make you feel at home, given the fact that she will greet you with the warmest of hugs. Since her biggest passion is psychology, Teodora will always make sure to focus on helping other people. And the cherry on the top? She plans on being “the funnier one” in the committee (sorry about that, Bogdan). Apart from her valuable experience as a Delegate, the time spent being an Observer has taught her quite a lot about being a good Chairperson, so she knows exactly how to deal with “intrusive Delegates” (you know, those who speak a lot even when they’re not directly involved in a subject?! Yeah, that might or might not be Teodora sometimes, too), experienced Delegates and, of course, first-time Delegates. And no, not by counter-argumenting them under the table, but rather being tolerant and encouraging towards everyone:

“Don’t be afraid to speak up your mind as long as you consider your speech relevant to the topic. Unlike myself, last year. You should grab the opportunity to share your opinion with the others.”

It is that easy! So don’t miss your chance and join the ranks!

 

Journalist: Tell us a little bit about your previous MUN experience.

Teodora: This is my third GalMUN edition. I’ve begun in the 9th grade when I took part as an Observer, then I proceeded to be a Delegate in the 10th grade, when I was awarded the Distinguished Delegate Award.

Journalist: When you were a delegate, which qualities did you wish your chair had and how do you plan to implement them as a chair yourself?

Teodora: I really liked both of my Chairpersons, but I have to say that Maia was funnier and Irina was more engaged in the activity. I plan to mix their styles and strike a balance between a fun and a serious community, in order to create the best experience for our delegates.

Also, Teo admits that being an observer has its perks because you can notice some Chairs’ flaws, as some of them tend to focus only on one of the aspects of the debate. However, she definitely thinks that, between her and Bogdan, she is going to be the “funnier one”.

Journalist: Is there something you did as a delegate that you would absolutely hate to see your delegates do now?

Teodora: I was very intrusive and found it annoying when Delegates would get involved in subjects that did not particularly concerned them. Nevertheless, I used to do this a lot, too.

Laughing, Teodora recalls a moment from last year’s GalMUN, when other Delegates were discussing the Gibraltar situation and she, as Western Sahara, used to raise a lot of points, not really giving a chance to speak to the delegates that were actually involved.

Journalist: What would be your advice to a first time delegate?

Teodora (still laughing from the previous question): Don’t be afraid to speak up your mind as long as you consider your speech relevant to the topic. Unlike myself, last year. You should grab the opportunity to share your opinion with the others.

Journalist: Any pet-peeves we should know about?

Teodora: I do not have any pet-peeves related to MUN.

However, you should know that Teo really hates nail files so don’t bring this topic up if you want to get on her good side. If you’re looking forward to getting on Teo’s good side, then you should try talking about psychology. It’s that easy.

Journalist: Alright, well, we want to discover your creative side, so we’ll move onto some unexpected questions. Why do we wear shoes?

Teodora (chuckling): Wouldn’t it be weird to walk barefoot on the street? Or maybe, in the past, someone told us to wear shoes and a trend started so that’s why we wear them now.

Journalist: How many square metres of pizza are consumed every year in Europe?

Teodora (not even thinking twice about the answer): I have no idea, but most of them are consumed in my house.

Journalist: Here we go, last question. If we were walking on our hands and everything in the world remained the same, the sun would set in the East. Or would it not?

Teodora (wanting to keep a straight face, but still giggling): But would we be able to see it set?

Following this topic, Teodora and I had a long discussion at the end of which both of us agreed that we’ve discovered a new conspiracy theory. If this interview caught your attention, then write your application now, in order to keep up with the surprises the SOCHUM committee has prepared

motto: tough times never last, but tough people do.

II. ECOSOC’s CHAIRS – VLAD & ALEXANDRA

VLAD

Searching for a Chair who is ready to treat the new Delegates the same way he wishes he were treated, were he a Delegate himself? Your quest is finally over! Vlad Jipa is the Chair of ECOSOC at this year’s GalMUN. He is by far the Prince Charming of this edition, boasting the ability to kill you with his beauty and then bring you back to life with his intelligence and wittiness. Don’t let the fact that he’s a straight A student, master of no less than 3 foreign languages (one of which happens to be, of course, the language of love), very attractive, very stylish… God, does this list ever end?! Anyway! Don’t let any of that intimidate you! With open arms and an open heart, Vlad awaits you to apply for a Delegate position in his committee.

Even if you’re a first-timer, he sure knows how to “treat” any fears you may have: “Raise your placard! Ignore your emotions and trust your instincts. Once you stand up for the first time, you’ll be eager to answer the points of information and get involved.”

Convincing enough? Wait till you talk to him in person!

 

Journalist: First of all, tell us a little about yourself and your previous MUN experience.

Vlad: The first time I signed up for a MUN was in the 9th grade, and I was thrilled to debate on worldwide issues. This experience made me sign up one more time in the 10th grade. And, well… here I am now! Although I’ve never thought this would really happen, I am the chairperson of the ECOSOC Committee.

I could really see the spark in his eyes. It showed me that he truly is honoured to be part of the Galmun Team, continuing the legacy of his former chairpersons.

Journalist: When you were a delegate, which qualities did you wish your chair had and how do you plan to implement them now as a chair yourself?

Vlad: I remember that I was scared to death that I was going to be mocked after my very first speech. I had been studying English for much less than the other students around me, so my speaking skills had to be worked on a lot. Even though I knew that nobody was there to make fun of me, I was still afraid of speaking in public. Looking back, I believe that what really opened me up were my friendly chairpersons, Roxana and Adelina, they helped me outperform myself. Therefore, I want to be a kind Chair, one that supports his delegates, but who also makes them speak up. It’s a strange mix, after all – be their friend, but oblige them to talk.

Journalist: Is there something you did as a delegate that you would absolutely hate to see your delegates do now?

Vlad: I had so many ideas, but I was, most of the time, way too scared to put them into words. Strangely enough, I’ve never been awarded the “Sleeping Beauty” ‘prize’. I guess this is what I’d hate to see my delegates do – have ideas, but not speak up their minds because they are afraid. Hopefully, this conference will make even the shy ones understand that ideas are to be expressed, not kept to oneself, and that everybody appreciates those who have the courage to express themselves freely.

Vlad also let me in on a secret – his fear of being made fun of went on as far as punishments are concerned. He never wanted to be put in the position to dance or sing, so he was always back with 10 minutes in advance. He would love for his delegates to put their fears aside and unleash themselves – not only during speeches, but also at the social events.

Journalist: What would be your advice to a first-time delegate?

Vlad: I know it seems hard, with all the rules, referring to yourself using the third person and all that. I think I have the cure, though. Raise your placard! Ignore your emotions and trust your instincts. Once you stand up for the first time, you’ll be eager to answer the points of information and get involved. So if you want all your fear to fade away, all you have to do is… raise your placard! Trust me, everything will run smoothly afterwards. You’ll lose the feeling of “I can’t do this” and you’ll start enjoying the whole experience.

Journalist: Any pet-peeves?

Vlad: I’ve got a tiny little piece of advice – DON’T BE LIKE INDIA AT GALMUN 2016(sorry delegate of India). I could barely stand that delegate! Don’t ask for Points of Information just because you want to receive the Best Delegate Award. Support your country’s AND ONLY your country’s position and alliances. Don’t get involved on a personal level, you do not represent yourself.

That’s when I first saw Vlad angry. He went red in an instant! I guess he’s not always a Prince Charming, so I’d kindly suggest to get on his good side. How to do that? Well…

Vlad: With me, it’s pretty damn hard to do that, because it depends on my mood. If I have a good day, then I’m everyone’s friend! But if I had a bloody bad one, then refrain from talking to me. However, I’d say that there’s no recipe to success with me, you just have to go with the flow.

He also loves Ferrero Rocher and a good talk over a glass of wine. You know… just as a random fact. Thought you’d want to know that.

Journalist: Why do we wear shoes?

Vlad: *ironically* Thank you for this question! Well, there are a lot of reasons. First of all – we can! And when we can do something, we usually do it. Secondly, it’s because our parents taught us to do so and now we’re used to it. Or maybe just because it’s way more comfortable to walk in shoes than barefoot. Especially for me, since I have flat feet just like Perry the Platypus – it’s a medical condition. It gives me a lot of pain if I don’t wear shoes, so I always have to wear them.

Journalist: How many square metres of pizza are consumed in Europe every year?

Vlad: A lot. Definitely a lot. I have virtually no idea. But I’m sure that my friends and I eat a huge amount of that. #houseeveryweekend

Journalist: If we were walking on our hands and everything else in the world remained the same, the sun would set in the East. Or would it not?

Vlad: Everything’s relative. Probably it would still set in the West. However, why would we walk on our hands and… How could we all do this? Eh, I will never be able to walk on my hands, so I’ll probably never know. Ask an acrobat, for God’s sake! I’m the Chairperson of the ECOSOC Committee! (laughing)

All in all, I know who’s my top pick for the most handsome Chair, funniest Chair, smartest Chair and well, best Chair! If you’re still not convinced, then apply for a place in Vlad’s Committee and see for yourself!

motto: I am crazy enough to succeed.
ALEXANDRA

Intelligent? Check!

Sarcastic? Check!

Attentive? Check!

Partly fairy, originating from a world that our mundane minds cannot comprehend? Check!

If this sounds too good to be true, you need to seriously readjust your expectations, because this description seems to fit Alexandra like a glove! She is one of the Chairs of this year’s GalMUN, leading the highly competitive ECOSOC. At a first glance, she looks frail, which you would probably expect from half a fairy anyway, but she definitely has no time to waste on nonsense. She has her earphones on all the time for a pretty good reason, you know. Not to mention that she absolutely hates people’s indecisiveness. However, that doesn’t mean there aren’t any ways you could take to reach her heart: „Make me laugh and don’t be afraid to join the most heated arguments, that’s where the real fun is!”

Oh, and if all of that fails, simply bring a cup of tea. She literally runs on it!

 

Alexandra: “I’m a student in the 11th grade at “Vasile Alecsandri” National High School. As a Delegate, I have participated in two MUNs so far and this is going to be the first time I’d be chairing a committee. I have to admit that I am more excited than nervous about this experience, because I’ve always been fascinated by the intricate clockwork of the conference.”

Journalist: “When you were a delegate, which qualities did you wish your Chair had and how do you plan to implement them now as a Chair yourself?”

Alexandra: “At that time, I genuinely wished they had been more friendly or eager to bond with us, the Delegates. This session things will be different, because there will be team-building and social events prior, as well as through the conference.”

So far so good, wouldn’t you say? She does fit the first part of that nice fairy description: sweet, loving,… you know, the usual. But don’t you ever dare to underestimate her, because Alexandra is by far the type of girl (does this term sound slightly derogatory for a magical creature? Hopefully not, otherwise who knows what she might do with that dust of hers!) who knows exactly what she wants and, even more importantly, what she doesn’t want:

Alexandra: “I hate that moment when suddenly all the Delegates become quiet because they’re too shy, afraid or whatever to raise another Motion. However, I am so guilty of doing the exact same thing now and then…”

There goes another busted myth: “fairy tale characters are perfect.” No, they are not, so don’t worry about your not being perfect either. Here, at GalMUN, we don’t expect you to be. We expect you to grow! Her advice to first-timers surely complements this idea perfectly:

Alexandra: “Do not be afraid to join the most heated arguments, that’s where the real fun is!”

Journalist: “Any pet-peeves you care to share with us?”

Alexandra: “People’s indecisiveness.”

Oh, that was pretty straight-forward! Don’t start fidgeting in your chair (no pun intended) over there, though, taking part in the debate is not as difficult as it seems when you do your research properly. Besides, we’ve made sure to find out exactly what you need to know to get on your Chairperson’s good side:

Alexandra: “Make me laugh and bear in mind that I have my earphones on for a steady good reason.”

Need an extra tip? Alexandra literally runs on tea, so if you’ve caused some trouble and you’re not the humorous type or you’re simply too taken aback by this fairy’s presence to come up with a witty joke, simply bring a cup filled to the brim. She may not love you for it, but she will at least have her hands too full and too warm to scold you for a couple of minutes.

 

Now, let’s see how she handles some off-the-script questions. Jump on board!

Journalist: “Why do we wear shoes?”

Alexandra: “Because we can! We desperately want to believe that we are superior to any other creature (isn’t she already?!)so we surround ourselves with objects that seem to be rather inaccessible to other species… Or maybe because it would be a great sin not to wear those stilettos… Who knows?”

No, boys, that stiletto-sin doesn’t apply to you. No need to panick! You could consider jumping out of your sneakers for the conference, though…

Journalist: “How many square metres of pizza are consumed in Europe every year?”

Alexandra: “700 million people x 12 months x 2 times/month x 1 m2 =16800 million m2?”

Alright… she might have taken this a tad too seriously… Told you she wasn’t all smiles and lovely hearts.

Journalist: “If we were walking on our hands and everything else in the world remained the same, the sun would set in the East. Or would it not?”

Alexandra: “Nope, the Sun is too busy to keep on shining to even consider setting in the opposite direction.”

 

Thank you, Alexandra! You’ve been great!

As for you, Delegates, it’s time for you to rise and shine, too! The clock is ticking and GalMUN is approaching at a steady pace!

motto: logic will get you from A to Z. imagination will get you everywhere.

 

III. WHO’s CHAIRS – IULIA & BIANCA

IULIA

Iulia Gheorghe. A 12th grader. In case you are wondering why the Baccalaureate and the admission to University do not seem enough for her, let’s just say it’s too hard to kick a habit. Especially when that habit dates back to when she was only a 5th grader. Fast forward 5 years, 3 different committees and about a thousand hiccups later, she is now chairing for the second time. And, since the World Health Organization is by no means tackling light topics, you will definitely benefit a lot from her experience “behind the wheel”.

Beware, though! She is known to confiscate pens and notes. In case you are aiming both for a Best Delegate Award and a new (Best) love interest, she will be right behind you, scrutinizing your every move. With a moderately understanding attitude, of course: “I will try to avoid sending messages that are too formal and rigid. I looove being bossy, but I will try not to be! As a Chairperson, you have to understand that the Delegates look up to you and perceive you as a model.”

So go ahead! Write your application and put her to the test!

 

Iulia: “As a Messenger, I found the whole thing extremely interesting, even if I couldn’t really understand much. It was fascinating to me how all of those high schoolers could interact in such a way and discuss such important issues at that age. 2 years later, I applied for a Delegate position myself: Saudi Arabia, UNICEF. The topic, Child Marriage, is still in my Top 3 most interesting ones ever debated.”

She admits that she “didn’t do much” back then, as she was simply following the conversation and trying to wrap her head around what a “Motion” might be (Note to our first-time MUNers: we all gotta start somewhere, don’t we?). Fast forward 5 years, 3 different committees and about a thousand hiccups later, she is now chairing for the second time.

Iulia: “My first experience as a Chairperson was quite daunting, as I wasn’t sure I would get along with Cristiana (shoutout to Cristiana Ţepeş, currently a London-based student, who graced us with her presence as a Delegate and Chairperson for several years in a row). I knew that she was much more experienced, so I assumed she would not be patient enough to explain all of the procedures to me. She did, though, and I can definitely say that everything I know, I owe it to her.”

Journalist: “She was one of the great ones indeed. Let’s go back a little to when you were a Delegate, though. Which qualities did you wish your Chairperson had and how do you try to implement them as a Chair yourself?”

Iulia: “I don’t know exactly how to put it, but I think most of my Chairs were pretty intimidating. Especially when you are a beginner, it is absolutely nerve-racking to even raise your placard, let alone speak. So I wish they had tried to help us feel more confident. As a Chairperson myself, I plan on making my Delegates understand that they can always approach us with regard to whatever question they may have, even during the sessions. It’s important for everyone to understand things properly, otherwise they can’t participate the way they should. I will also try to avoid sending messages that are too formal and rigid. I looove being bossy, but I will try not to be! As a Chairperson, you have to understand that the Delegates look up to you and perceive you as a model, so you should act accordingly.”  (It will be interesting to see how that turns out, coming from a person who was known for confiscating pens and notes last year. Rest assured, though! Iulia is tough, but fair.)

Journalist: “Is there something you did as a delegate that you would absolutely hate to see your delegates do now?”

Iulia: “Honestly, I wasn’t one of the funny ones in the committee, which is a shame. But I would definitely hate to see my Delegates say that they are not open to points of information.

In case you are still slightly nervous about applying because you dread standing in front of 20 people and bearing the burden of, quite literally, an entire country on your shoulders, Iulia has some advice for first-timers, too.

Iulia: Do your research well and ask the right questions! All you have to do is stand up once. After you’ve broken the ice, you will find yourself unable to stop talking!

Journalist: Any pet-peeves you care to share?

Iulia: I kind of hit the roof when people don’t understand what a Position Paper actually is, so they copy-paste a ton of information and press Send. It doesn’t work like that! Also, I don’t like it when people speak just for the sake of speaking.

Noted, MUNers? Noted! Before we make her sound like too much of a deal to handle, though, let’s see what the best way to get on her good side is. We promised we would keep that a secret until after the conference, but…

Iulia: The Delegates have to prove that they are responsible. But I would also love for them to embrace the challenges that may come, including the funny punishments!

Journalist: Why do we wear shoes?

Iulia (her lip twitches a little and her face turns slightly pale. She definitely didn’t see that coming): …because they make the outfit cooler! If I had to chance to invest in something, it would be shoes. They are the best obsession!!

Journalist: Can’t say I don’t see a point here. Moving forward: how many square metres of pizza are consumed in Europe every year?

Iulia (keeping a serious face. How can anyone keep a serious face when talking about pizza?): Too many.

Journalist: If we were walking on our hands and everything else in the world remained the same, the Sun would set in the East. Or would it not?

Iulia: No! It’s science. You’re the one walking on their hands, not the Sun!

She has handled herself pretty well, wouldn’t you say, MUNers? Pretty well, indeed! This sweet conversation we had has also brought to light a very important aspect related to the GalMUN experience as a whole: 15 years of tradition and experience have gone by in the blink of an eye, but there is still so much to learn. From YOU. So grab your pen, laptop, iPad or whatever fits your style, and get ready to write your best application yet!

motto: if you want something, go get it.

 

BIANCA

 

Bianca Roşca Mayer is an invaluable source of advice and inspiration for all those who aspire to become MUN-masters. She first attended GalMUN last year, but Galaţi was followed suit by Cluj-Napoca, Bacău and Iaşi, resulting in tremendous experience and a pretty detailed picture of what she expects both from herself and her Delegates. Do you need some insight? Well, since we’re always at your service, here you have it: “Points of information! A lot of them! I would really like our Delegates to be spontaneous. MUNs are not always about ideas that you read at home and then apply during the sessions.”

Doesn’t seem that hard, does it? Indeed, but don’t fall into the trap of underestimating the importance of the event. At GalMUN, time is of the essence! Even when your “essence” ends up in the Gossip Box, you know… After all, you are dealing with a Chairperson who is all for the “hippy” side of life, so don’t hesitate to embrace the fun!

 

Bianca: “I can definitely say that the Security Council is my favourite committee of them all. I first discovered it at NapoMUN, where I represented Sweden. It took me a while to figure out the special rules and caucuses, but this is the committee which also brought me my first award. With this in mind, chairing the World Health Organization will be an interesting experience for me. The expectations are very high, and the topic we have chosen is complex, also involving many subtopics. We will try to help our delegates understand which ones are the most relevant for this session. Not to mention that this is my first experience as a Chairperson, so there is quite a bit of pressure, but Iulia is helping me a lot.”

As to how she will handle herself in this esteemed position, Bianca already has a fairly detailed picture:

Bianca: “The Chairpersons I liked best were always the ones who actually got involved and tried to help us figure things out, especially when it came to writing the resolution. There was one time when, as a Main Submitter, I felt unsure because our Chairpersons were very distant and we didn’t know exactly what was expected of us. As such, I think that I will be serious during the sessions, trying to remain focused at all times- which I know is much more challenging than it seems. But that does not mean that I will refuse to approach the Delegates when they face difficulties or have few ideas. I think it is important to give advice during the conference itself and push the participants to bring their ideas to the next level. After the Closing Ceremony, that advice doesn’t have much of an impact anymore.”

Journalist: Is there something you did as a Delegate that you would absolutely hate to see your Delegates do now?

Bianca: YES!!! There is something I actually did once in the Human Rights Council. I was writing down ideas for a speech without listening to what another Delegate was saying, so afterwards, when I stood up, I ended up saying the exact same thing. I’d like our Delegates to pay attention! Learn from my mistakes, okay?

Journalist: What would be your advice to a first-time Delegate?

Bianca: Don’t think of yourselves as “first-timers”. Speak your mind without wondering if the others will judge you. Just go for it!

Easier said than done, you might think. And you wouldn’t be 100% wrong, seeing as the Chairpersons expect you to say what’s on your mind, but not exactly everything that’s on your mind:

Bianca: I get really annoyed when people want to say things without actually having something to say. They just start blurting out random ideas, which can be frustrating for the others, who have prepared themselves well. I do hope that if there was ever a time when I didn’t have anything meaningful to say, I just kept my mouth shut! Also, I don’t like it when people act as if they knew everything, so they feel entitled to dismiss anybody else’s ideas.

It is obvious that there are quite a lot of things you shouldn’t do in this quite formal type of Conference, especially if you’re planning on being distinguished with an Award. But let’s see what you can do to get everything right. According to Bianca, the answer is short and simple:

Bianca: “Points of information! A lot of them! And avoid reading from a piece of paper that you’ve prepared from home. I would really like our Delegates to be spontaneous. MUNs are not always about ideas that you read at home and then apply during the sessions.

As you can see, she is an invaluable source of advice. But let’s get this order-loving Chairperson out of her comfort zone, plunging her directly into the “hippy” area that she allegedly cherishes so much! Ready? Steady? Go!

Journalist: Why do we wear shoes?

As you might imagine, she was in denial at first as to whether she was actually supposed to answer this question. In the end, she did get round to it, though:

Bianca: There is trash everywhere, so everyone would hate stepping on it every time we go out of the house. I cannot imagine myself not wearing shoes.

Journalist: How many square metres of pizza are consumed in Europe every year?

Bianca: WHAT?! And how should I know that? (Okay, her denial might slip into anger faster than we thought. Ever heard about the 5 stages of grief?) I couldn’t say exactly how many, but probably 5 or 6 times more than the population of Europe.

Journalist: If we were walking on our hands and everything else in the world remained the same, the sun would set in the East. Or would it not?

Seeing as she immediately blurted out this response, it’s safe to assume that she has just reached that 5th stage: acceptance.

Bianca: No, I don’t think so. I don’t believe this is a matter of perspective, it’s rather about how the planet works.

Great thinking, girl! Thank you for this inspiring talk!

Now, are you ready to be subjected to the same unexpected challenges and mind-blowing crises as our beloved Chairperson? Then get down to writing your GalMUN application, Delegates! This Journalist is now yielding the floor back to you!

motto: silence is never the answer. speak out loud.

IV. CRISIS’ CHAIRS – ALIN & DARIA

ALIN

Meet Alin Hampău from Bacău (see what I did there?), the one who is able to brighten your whole day, without even realising it. Beginning with a wide smile, he exuded an aura of self-confidence and felicity from the word go, as he explained he is a 17 years old high schooler. Rarely does one see such a witty and stunningly charming person, with eyes in which you can constantly see flickering, like a burning flame, a radiant glow of determination. His disarming sense of humour will bring hundreds of smiles to your lips, as he has an amusing comment for everything.

“Besides food (here is one of those wise, playful remarks I was telling you about), you don’t really have to do much to be on my good side.” As you can see, the way to Alin’s heart is through his stomach, and the heartfelt, lively tone he uses when he admits this makes it sound like it is the most natural thing in the whole wide world (not that it’s wrong or anything of the sort, as the saying goes “Keep your friends close, and your snacks closer”). It’s easy to keep him happy, as long as you have a genuine personality and some knowledge about how to give earth-shattering, warm hugs. Despite the fact that his self-confidence is a tiny bit intimidating, his riveting personality draws you in.

 

Journalist: “Which qualities did you wish your Chairperson had and how do you try to implement them as a Chair yourself?”

Alin: “Back when I was a delegate, I was looking for a role-model, an inspiration, a person I could look up to.”

Nevertheless, he wanted them to be on the same wavelength, to see a genuine and gregarious spirit in his Chair– to put it simply, a friend. Having such a bubbly personality, he clearly promises to be a refreshing and reliable Chairperson. We’re undoubtedly betting on it!

Journalist: “Is there something you did as a delegate that you would absolutely hate to see your delegates do now?”

Alin (his mouth curving into a wry smile): “Yes, one thing I did as a delegate was to ask obvious stupid questions that demanded a really stupid answer in return. Hearing that as a Chairperson would be horrifying.”

Even though these questions are pointless, he admits that asking them as a delegate is hilarious, because you can always annoy people or even your enemies, for that matter. Let’s pretend we don’t think he was a (priceless) mischief-maker and move on to the next question.

Journalist: “Any pet-peeves we should know about?”

Alin: “I hate it when someone explains something to me that I already know and they are consistent in explaining it. Also, I definitely hate it when people don’t hug other people properly, that’s super annoying. When you’re into a hug and you’re putting your soul into it and the other person does not, it’s really frustrating. Hey, come on, I’m giving you a piece of my soul here, do something!”

Please, dear MUNers, engrave this message on your heart: under no circumstances are you allowed to forget about warm bear hugs. Additionally, don’t be a conceited know-it-all, everyone finds that annoying, admit it. That’s not such a demanding request, if you think about it. Even so, here is how to get on his good side…

Alin (grinning): “Besides food, you don’t really have to do much to be on my good side. Of course, it would be nice if we had some common interests, but I can pretty much get along with anyone who is a decent human being, to be honest.” (And someone who gives the best hugs, obviously)

Now let’s find out some unexpected answers to some unexpected questions.

Journalist:  “How many square metres of pizza are consumed in Europe every year?”

Alin (nonchalantly, as if I was asking him what he was doing): “An indefinite amount, I would say, because pizza is life, of course. I couldn’t live without it.”

Journalist: “If we were walking on our hands and everything else in the world remained the same, the Sun would set in the East. Or would it not?”

Alin: “Uh, no, it would set in the West as it already does.”

Journalist: “Why do we wear shoes?”

Alin (scrunching up his face): “Because we want to avoid getting dirt on our feet, and also we wear shoes for style, they certainly are an important piece of anyone’s outfit. If you wear a pair of shoes which doesn’t match your outfit, it can ruin your whole look.”

This was definitely entertaining, don’t you agree? Write your application now to ensure that you will receive the best hugs, and maybe, if you have a stroke of luck, a slice of pizza.

motto: repetition is the path to mastery.

 

DARIA

Even though Daria Comănescu seems to be made of sugar and spice and everything nice, with her mellifluous voice and graceful movements, there is more to her than meets the eye. Behind that sweet, angelic smile of hers hide perseverance and wisdom that are truly remarkable for a 9th grader. She piques anyone’s curiosity when she lets on that she has the knowledge of 6 MUNs (a truly awe-inspiring achievement, right?): 2 GalMUNs, 2 IașiMUNs and 2 BtMUNs.

It wasn’t easy, at first: “Once, I didn’t understand the topic and I delivered a speech that was totally off-topic and I was so embarrassed afterwards,” but she followed her heart, learned from her mistakes, worked her way up to the top and everything turned out to be all right. Honesty with her, as well as honesty with yourself, is a must-have trait if you want to get in with her, which is manageable, to say the least. In all honesty, there is no denying that she is so strong, so passionate about what she is doing that she can be also gentle and humble.

 

Journalist: “Which qualities did you wish your Chairperson had and how do you try to implement them now as a Chair yourself?”

Daria: “I wish my Chair was more involved in the conference and also, that he was a sociable person who would help me enjoy and learn something from unmoderated debates, because some people were talking in Romanian at times or constantly checking their mobile phones. There were moments when we were exhausted and we wanted breaks or funny punishments and that’s why I want to make sure that I know when these moments come and be able to do something to reconnect with my delegates.”

Considering the fact that she had some unpleasant experiences in the past, anyone may rest assured that she will be true to her word.

Journalist: “Is there something you did as a delegate that you would absolutely hate to see your delegates do now?”

Daria (laughing to herself, blushing slightly): “Once, I didn’t understand the topic and I delivered a speech that was totally off-topic and I was so embarrassed afterwards. I realised I had to read the topics more thoroughly before I talk.”

Journalist: “Any pet-peeves we should know about?”

Daria: “I don’t get annoyed easily, but I dislike those people who try to be who they are not.”

Journalist: “What about the best way to get on your good side?”

Daria: “To be honest, don’t try too hard to do that. Just be yourself; don’t forget about being truly honest with me. If you don’t like something about me, you can simply tell me.” (it definitely sounded like she knew what she was talking about)

So, as long as you stay true to yourself and you don’t go around talking things behind her back, you should be on the safe side.

Journalist:  “How many square metres of pizza are consumed in Europe every year?”

Daria (her forehead creased just a little bit, but she somehow managed to keep it cool): “I have no idea, but I will give you a number… (after a short while) 3 million?”

Journalist: “If we were walking on our hands and everything else in the world remained the same, the Sun would set in the East. Or would it not?”

Daria: Everything in the world remained the same? Then, no.

Journalist: “Why do we wear shoes?

Daria (looking at me wonderingly): “That is a very good question. I guess some of the girls would say because it is a passion, but I would say we wear shoes because there are moments when we just don’t want to hurt ourselves stepping on everything that we see, so we kind of need something between our legs and the ground.”

We couldn’t agree more. If you are a glutton for (funny) punishments, but also want to get to know this sweetheart, take a chance and send your application now!

motto: no one ever made a difference by being like everyone else.

 

V. ICJ’s CHAIRS – EMRE & ALIN

EMRE

Emre Yapici seems to be the embodiment of what a “by the book” Chair is. A student from Bucharest who constantly pursues the path of MUNs, dapper, smart and opinionated, who appears to have quite a technical view of the conference. The kind of chair whose committee will carry out orderly and productive debates, without much fuss. But, even though the debate is bound to be fantastic (believe us), it will go a bit differently. It won’t be boring, for a start. You’ll always find yourself thinking, listening, laughing and enjoying the discussion without being left out, in case public speaking isn’t your cup of tea. That is, because Emre is a “people person”, friendly and supportive, with a lot to share from his own experience and a lot to learn from you. And, much like a friendship, a conference’s key components are openness and communication, two things you’ll surely find in this year’s ICJ committee.

Journalist: Tell us about your past MUN experience.

Emre: I have been through almost all positions of an MUN.

Well, as you can see, he has experience. For any interested applicants, keep this in mind, as he surely is a person who will guide you as a first-timer, and understand the frustrations of a more experienced delegate, when things just aren’t going fast enough.

Journalist: When you were a delegate, which quality did you appreciate the most?

Emre: Humour.

Journalist: Is there something you did as a delegate that you’d absolutely hate to see your delegates do now?

Emre: I certainly wasn’t the best delegate, but I wouldn’t hate anything my delegates would do as long as they’d learn from it.

You’ve read it, learning it is. Be active and alert, and conscious that mistakes don’t mean you immediately lose face and have to give up, but rather they symbolise another step you’ve overcome on your way to being the best delegate.

Journalist: While on the subject, do you have any other pet-peeves?

Emre: Actually, I don’t.

Even though that might be a good thing, we are sort of curious whether there is anyone out there who can find his breaking point.

Journalist: How many square metres of pizza are consumed in Europe each year?

Emre: *amused* A lot, that’s for sure.

Journalist: What would your advice to a first-time delegate be?

Emre: Don’t worry too much, most likely you will understand the procedures during the session.

Which is great advice, actually, because as someone from the other side of the interview, we can tell you one of the most daunting parts is not really knowing what’s waiting for you once you do become a delegate. It’s good to know the path’s already paved for you, though.

Journalist: If we were walking on our hands and everything else in the world remained the same, do you think the sun would set in the east?

Emre: *smiling* It would set in the North, actually.

We’ve asked this question many times, but this was a new one. Guess we’ll truly know the answer when we get there.

Journalist: What would you say is the best way for someone to get on your good side?

Emre: Being positive, I would say.

Positivity surely is a recurring theme in this interview. But it’s a good thing, after all, because when a person is happy, all their qualities shine through, and maybe that’s the reason why he gets along so well with people. Because he always tries to see them in their best lighting.

Journalist: And finally, why do we wear shoes?

Emre: For the same reason we wear socks.

Which begs the question, why DO we wear socks? Maybe it’s the outfit, maybe it’s to avoid stepping into puddles you didn’t even imagine could get there, or maybe it’s all the sharp things that come out of their hiding place just to make sure your day isn’t going too well.

This session will go well, though. Under the guidance of Emre, you’re bound to enjoy loads of jokes and one-liners, while also engaging in productive debate, to make sure that, in the long run, you’ll be a better formed MUNer, with one more successful session in your bag.

motto: live your life fast, but be alive every second of it.

 

ALIN

As a first-time delegate, you might have already pictured what you want the conference to be like: daunting but intriguing, professional, with fiery debates, clashes of opinions where you will rise above all others, as The Best Delegate. Other experienced delegates, however, might suggest otherwise, much like this Chairperson does. Of course, it is of utmost importance that the debate goes well, however it would be no fun without, well, fun. Alin Oprea is a walking joke-box, and no topic is serious enough for him not to find something to make fun of. He exudes confidence and has a lot to say, should anyone listen, but, given his friendly, happy-go-lucky attitude, he doesn’t come off as (too) cocky. It’s safe to say that in this committee, if you listen closely, you will always hear muffled laughter coming from all corners of the room, even your own.

Journalist: Tell us a little about yourself and your previous MUN experience.

Alin: Well, I don’t have the biggest experience, as I only have three other sessions behind me, but I am one intriguing person, who wants to achieve more, so even if I’m not the most experienced in this field, I can surely do a great job handling my committee.

Journalist: When you were a delegate, which qualities did you wish your chair had and how do you plan these qualities now, as a chair yourself?

Alin: From my chairs, I expected them to be more engaged in the debate itself, to handle it more carefully. Also, I wanted them to be more active, not ignore their delegates, so I would grant my delegates a fierce experience and some harsh debating.

Basically, conduct yourself like nothing could stop you, because surely there will be someone who will try. And under the guidance of this self-described “intriguing person”, breaking the ice and getting caught up in the debate will be a piece of cake.

Journalist: Is there something you did as a delegate that you would absolutely hate to see your delegates do now?

Alin: That would be talking endlessly and also, staying on their phones most of the time, that’s the thing I hate the most. Any trouble they could make, actually…

That’s like saying he wouldn’t like looking in a mirror when regarding a Delegate. But after all, where’s the fun without the trouble?

Journalist: Do you have any other pet-peeves?

Alin: (silence, motionless for the first time since the interview began)

Journalist: Pet peeves, do you know what pet-peeves are?… Things that people do, that annoy you…

Alin: Ah, oh yeah… well, um, I believe that not listening carefully is one thing, especially in a debate where what your opponents say in the discussion can help you destroy them.

Journalist: How many square meters of pizza are consumed in Europe every year?

Alin: More than I can eat, for sure, but I would say above a million.

Journalist: What would your advice be to a first-time delegate?

Alin: What I would say, um, to him is that he shouldn’t be afraid because there are thousands like him, so he should view every experience as an eye-opener. I believe this is good place to start, if he wants to go to more MUNs, as we’re working very hard here.

Journalist: Why him? (DPG approving in the background)

Alin: What, oh… I’m sorry, I didn’t assume the gender, I just… it can be a her, too, it can be anyone

So, follow your gut feeling! Whether your point is regarded as valid or not, the main focus seems to be learning, improving on your weaker points to become the best version of yourself, whoever that is.

Journalist: If we were walking on our hands and everything else in the world stayed the same, would the sun set in the East?

Alin: Well, definitely, the world’s upside down, and it depends on how we view it so, yeah…

Journalist: What would you say is the best way for someone to get on your good side?

Alin: *again, a golden moment of silence* Well, I reckon if one wants to get on my good side they should be responsive to what I say, because I have lots of things to say, you know. Also, have some fun, don’t be so sturdy and just have fun, even if you won’t be the best, all that matters is to have some fun.

Listen closely. And bearing in might what he’s said before, all these things he has to say might just be the end of him, if you don’t manage to get on his good side, after all.

Journalist: Why do we wear shoes?

Alin: Why do we wear shoes…

Journalist: Yup.

Alin: *pause* Well, for many reasons, but I believe it’s because we see others wearing shoes. If they didn’t wear shoes, we wouldn’t wear shoes either.

Loud, contagious laughter, jokes that crop up out of nowhere and constant jumps between being goofy and being serious are things you should expect from Alin, who stands as a beginner in his position as a Chairperson, and who surely has as much to learn as any interested applicants do.

motto: feel the fear and do it anyway.

 

VI. ISCPSC’s CHAIRS – DRAGOȘ & ALEXANDRA (OR ALEKA FOR DIBS)

DRAGOȘ

Let’s meet Dragoș Ene, an 11th grader who dedicates his time to debating projects, MUNs in particular. We weren’t at all surprised when he told us that he had participated in numerous activities and events, as he does exude experience and self-confidence. That is something one must build and constantly work on, so we could all learn a lesson or two from him. Pens and notebooks at the ready?

We sure hope so, because it’s not every day that we run into Chairpersons whose motto is: “Spam us with your questions!” It feels like a gush of fresh air to see that sometimes, MUNs are not all about formality, but rather about making sure that everyone understands something from this experience: “I’ve been to numerous conferences, both as a Delegate and as a Chair. But not the number of MUNs you’ve attended matter, what matters is what you’ve learned from each one.”Even when that involves becoming the most annoying person on Earth during the research period. There is someone out there who can take it, and we happen to have found him right here, among us!

 

Dragoş: “I’ve been to numerous conferences, both as a Delegate and as a Chair. But not the number of MUNs you’ve attended matter, what matters is what you’ve learned from each one.”

Journalist: “When you were a Delegate, which qualities did you wish your Chair had and how do you plan to implement them now as a Chair yourself?”

Dragoş: “One time when I was a Delegate, one of the Chairs directly interfered in the debate. I truly believe that such interventions should be used only in the last resort, if the debate goes off-road big time, not when the Chairperson has to add something. I will always look to find alternatives to such a practice.”

Journalist: “Is there something you did as a Delegate that you would absolutely hate to see your Delegates do now?”

Dragoş: “Yes. Get upset when I have an AWESOME Point of information, but don’t get to say it. I tried to understand this as a Delegate, the fact that Chairs can’t read minds, and now I fully see how hard it is to give everybody the chance to speak up, especially if they usually don’t.”

I probably shouldn’t even have asked this question, as Dragoş seems like a very friendly person. He’s definitely the type of Chairperson in front of whom you feel confident enough to express your opinions. Let’s just move forward, then. Full steam ahead!

Journalist: “What would be your advice for a first-time Delegate?”

Dragoş: “Ask for advice. We’ve all been there, you have no reason to be shy. Especially when doing your research. Spam us with your questions and things you don’t understand. An informed delegate is a delegate that will most probably speak up his mind.”

Journalist: “Your answer inspires me, honestly!!”

It’s definitely not every day that we run into Chairpersons whose motto is: “Spam us with your questions!” It feels like a gush of fresh air to see that sometimes, MUNs are not all about formality, but rather about making sure that everyone gets to learn something from this experience. Even when that involves becoming the most annoying person on Earth during the research period. There is someone out there who can take it!

Anyways, we’re already tired of such serious questions. Aren’t you, too? Let’s get to the important stuff!

Journalist: “So, Dragoş, I have a crucial question for you! Why do we wear shoes?”

Dragoş: “Have you ever stubbed your pinky toe? From a pain scale from 1 to 10, stubbing your toe is 11.  That’s why we wear shoes.”

Journalist: “How many square metres of pizza are consumed in Europe every year?”

Dragoş: “A little less than are made, I assume.”

That was really nice, I appreciate the honesty and the funny answers. All in all, this is GalMUN, folks: entertainment, amazing people and good questions. There is only one thing you can do now: write your application and join the ranks of the oldest- and best- MUN in Romania!

motto: the future rewards those who press on. I don’t have time to feel sorry for myself. I don’t have time to complain. I’m going to press on.

 

ALEXANDRA (OR ALEKA, DAMMIT)

Aleka Eni is a 12th grader, a very interesting person and maybe even a mysterious one. Who knows? She obviously dislikes bragging about herself, since, upon being asked to say something about herself, she just started saying how much she loves GalMUN. Truth be told, we cannot judge her. There is so much to love about GalMUN. But that doesn’t mean she doesn’t have plenty to brag about! She won the Distinguished Delegate Award when she first participated in this conference. Isn’t that something you want to learn from the master herself? Yes, we thought so, too!

She admits that she is not a fan of rules and formalities and, as she herself puts it, she is ready to welcome everyone’s personality and behavior. The very obvious catch to this one? That behavior has to be decent! Which, if you’re honest, doesn’t seem like too big of a deal to handle.

Speaking of which! There is actually something that may seem too big of a deal to handle at a first glance this year, and that is this entire committee itself! However, Aleka has a great piece of advice for each and every one of you: “Don’t be afraid to try! No one is born perfect or skilled and GalMUN sure is a place where one can learn a lot.”

We hope you’ve heard her loud and clear, Delegates! This is your chance!

 

Aleka: “There was this really great atmosphere and everyone seemed to have a good time. It was all about dressing great, speaking English like a pro and, above all, it was about having interesting ideas. I think MUNs, in general, are the type of activities that give hope for the future, as you see who might possibly be the leaders of our generation.”

She admits that she is “not a fan of rules and formalities,” and that’s the thing her Chairpersons lacked in the past. Of course, she will try to correct this as a Chairperson herself. As to whether there is something she did as a Delegate that she would absolutely hate to see her Delegates do now, Aleka gave an answer that I am sure will make you feel extremely confident:

Aleka: “No, I do not think there is a thing I did that I wouldn’t like to see my Delegates doing. There are some limits Delegates should not cross, though, such as being rude with one another or with the Chairs. I do not welcome hate.”

She is really open-minded, wouldn’t you say? As she herself put it, she seems ready to “welcome everyone’s personality and behaviour, as long as it is decent.”

Journalist: “You told me what you were like in the Delegate position, what you will be like as a Chairperson… But now I want to hear what would be your advice for a first-time delegate.”

Aleka: “I really do have a valuable piece of advice for new delegates: don’t be afraid to try. No one is born perfect or skilled and GalMUN sure is a place where one can learn a lot. The main idea here is to not be afraid of expressing yourself due to minor inconveniences like not being a pro at English. I have seen many people refraining from speaking just because they were afraid they would not be as good as the others. But as long as you can share your message and make yourself be understood, there is nothing to worry about.”

Even if you might think that all of this is difficult to put into practice, you should reconsider! There is room for every opinion in Aleka’s committee, just as long as it is backed by arguments. You would be lucky to have such a Chairperson, Delegates! She’s really devoted and she really likes everything about GalMUN. Well, who wouldn’t love GalMUN, right?

Journalist: “And now, Aleka, do you have any pet-peeves you would want to share?”

Aleka: “OH MY GOD, YES!!! (extreme eyeroll) There is nothing I hate more than being interrupted when I am speaking, the worse if this happens repeatedly. There are these people that barge into the conversation MID-SENTENCE! MY MID-SENTENCE! And it’s like a trigger button for me, it kills my mood completely and really angers me to the point I have to leave rooms not to start a fight.”

Journalist: “I think there is also something more… Tell me!”

Aleka: “Maybe another thing that annoys me to death is misogynistic remarks, but when it comes to that, I really do fight.”

Journalist: “What about the best way to get on your good side? Don’t worry, we’ll keep this a secret until after the conference!”

Aleka: “I sometimes seem like a very distant, maybe arrogant person. But getting on my good side is not that hard. I really love humour and being sincere, open. If you are a person that does not look down on others it is a good thing, because I do not like extremely arrogant people – there is a slight difference between being defensive and being rude. Also, I am pretty known to instantly fall for intelligence and culture… So do not be afraid to slay the debate with your knowledge!”

Alright, alright, we’ve got the picture. And it’s an encouraging one! But we’re already tired of the formalities!  Let’s get to the important stuff!

Journalist: “Why do we wear shoes?”

Aleka: “Umm, this is a bit hilarious. I could be totally scientific about this, but I am in love with shoes and I have to say that I wear them just because they look so, but sooooo good! I don’t really don’t know why other people wear shoes, but I guess it’s for feet protection?”

Well, Aleka appears to like this question. And that is why I’m so happy that I interviewed her: she likes challenges.

Journalist: “Well, let’s talk about a favourite subject for everyone: pizza. How many square metres of pizza are consumed in Europe every year?”

Aleka: “I don’t exactly know, but I bet it’s a mind-blowing number. Considering how much pizza I eat… yeah, totally mind-blowing!” (She definitely didn’t expect to be asked something like this.)

Journalist: “If we were walking on our hands and everything else in the world remained the same, the Sun would set in the East. Or would it not?”

Aleka: “This reminds me of Physics and all the classes I skipped. (Don’t you dare use this as an excuse for playing truant, Delegates! Just remember that Chairpersons are also human!) But even with my limited knowledge, I think the sun would totally set in the West, like it does now. Just because our perspective changes, doesn’t always mean the truth becomes invalid.”

She handled all these questions very well. I really learned something new in the conversation I had with Aleka. And all of the GalMUN community can learn something new from you, people. So, raise your placards and make your voices be heard! We want to hear you! Get ready to write your best application!

motto: confidence is one’s best weapon.

VII. CHIEF OF STAFF – ANDREEA DIMA

Andreea Dima is the mastermind behind this GalMUN’s organisational process. From searching for investors, to “being like an eagle” during the conference, she is the one to get the game running. Exited and confident as always, she is to enlighten us with regard to some issues that have been bothering us for some time.

Journalist: “First of all, tell us a little about yourself and your previous MUN experience?”

Andreea: “I’m a person who really enjoys taking risks, and GalMUN is definitely one of them! I attended last year’s GalMUN as the delegate representing France at ECOSOC and I got an Honourable Mention. I also participated in IașiMUN at the Crisis Committee, and although that was not nearly as intense an experience, I liked it because it made me realise that when you’re neutral, and you support a certain side, you have to negotiate with the others.”

Heard that, dear readers and thrill-seekers? If you’re looking for an adrenaline spike, GalMUN is the way to go for you will have to say goodbye to your comfort zone for these 4 amazing days of heated, but surely fruitful debates.

Journalist: “How do you envision your role as the Chief of Staff at GalMUN2018? What are you responsible of?”

Andreea: “Grossly simplified, my role is to make this year’s GalMUN a new experience for both first time delegates and MUN veterans. I have to organise everything so nobody would argue that GalMUN is just a common conference.”

So, if you’re searching for an unique opportunity to debate today’s most pressing matters in an academic, but delegate friendly environment, then rest assured for this anniversary edition of GalMUN won’t disappoint you.

Journalist: “What are the five qualities a Staff Member must posses?”

Andreea: “Seriousness. Implication. Creativity. The desire to work… A LOT (laughs in anticipation)… and, of course, some gorgeous organisational skills.”

Take notes, guys, for you have just found out quite a thing about the selection criteria.

Journalist: “What areas of improvement would you like to work on during this conference?”

Andreea: “I know I’m good at organising stuff in general, but I honestly want to develop my skills to the point that making decisions comes naturally to me, and I don’t have to question my project management skills anymore. Also, I’d like to be better at talking and persuading people in positions superior to mine.”

One refines their skills through practice, just like Andreea suggested. Since “repetition is the mother of all learning”, you could actually push your limits and become a better version of yourself by attending this year’s amazing GalMUN.

Journalist: “Are you a hunter or a gatherer?”

Andreea: “A hunter. A hunter for sure. When I set a goal, I do everything in order to achieve it. I adjust myself and the environment so I can make it happen. (pauses)… I meant I do everything in order to achieve it, but within legal and moral limits, obviously!”

Which brings us to the point that you can in fact win that Best Delegate Award… if you do everything within legal and moral limits, of course.

Journalist: “Creativity or knowledge?”

Andreea: “I’ll just have a mix of the two!”

Inspired choice, one might comment.

Journalist: “Lastly, how much does a mountain weigh?”

Andreea: “I’ve never lifted one up, soo…” (shrugs her shoulders superiorly and smiles while mentally congratulating herself for nailing this final question)

In hindsight, this was one truly successful interview with one truly successful Chief of Staff who will definitely ensure that GalMUN will be one truly successful conference.

motto: it may be hard, but not impossible

 

VIII. PRESS CORPS’ CHAIRS – ALINA & TEODORA

ALINA

She’s the one who simply couldn’t let go! After being a Delegate and a (Deputy) Secretary General, it didn’t seem right to her not to give this amazing experience one last shot. So here she is, chairing the Press Corps! Because why would you stroll down the astonishing streets of Vienna when you can just get down to work and write your heart, fingers and mind out for GalMUN 2018? Don’t laugh, I don’t mean this ironically at all. Really, why would anyone miss GalMUN? Sure, doing your research might sometimes seem too time-consuming to bear (so is watching you do it and writing about it, trust me), preparing the Position Paper (or a Press Corps article, for that matter) may not turn out to be quite as easy as you had expected a one page long “essay” to be, and those heels can kill you during the first day of the conference! But if there is one way to describe all of this, that’s “one of a kind”. And if you don’t believe it when it comes from a girl studying abroad, handling exams and doing her best to be present even though that presence isn’t exactly physical, then you have only one choice left: Come and see for yourself!

 

motto: it’s going to happen because i’m going to make it happen.

 

TEODORA

Never had Teodora thought that she will participate in any activity which involved having conversations with total strangers, but now she hopes to change that. Sure, she would have enjoyed the comfort of watching everyone else struggle around her, but nothing great was ever achieved without hard work and she’s well aware of that. Presently, she tries to think positively and make the most of GalMUN 2018 without allowing her lack of experience to take the wind out of her sails. Whenever she gets distressed (that happens way too often because of her tendency to overthink and overanalyse everything), she motivates herself to go the full distance, even if it is difficult at times and strongly advises you to do the same. Therefore, don’t be afraid of a challenge and write your application now! You have nothing to lose.

motto: I honestly swear I am up to no good.